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140 58 Street, Building B Suit 5H-5
Brooklyn NY 11220
Office 718 492-3057
Fax 718 492-3555
Email 7164168@gthvacp.com

Monday, February 20, 2012

How Much Does A Boiler Cost?

Website with some boiler costing information. 

New boiler cost varies greatly depending on the type of boiler that is purchased.
New boiler cost ranges from $600-$40,000. 
Electric boiler cost ranges from $600-$2000; electric boilers are the cheapest type of boiler. Gas boiler prices range from $2500-$5000. 
Oil boiler cost is $3000-$6500. 
Wood pellet boilers cost $6000-$18,000. 
Steam boiler prices are around $10,000. 
Condensing boilers are some of the most expensive types of boilers; condensing boilers cost $20,000-$40,000. 
New boiler costs are also affected by location and where the boiler is purchased. In addition, new boiler costs are affected by whether the unit is mid-efficiency or high efficiency; high efficiency boilers cost more than mid efficiency units. Read more....

Saturday, February 18, 2012

Monthly Average Home Heating Oil Prices (in cents per gallon)

Interesting statistical data. looking at 10 years, from 2001 to 2011 for a month of January, price of oil went up from  $1.35 to $4.13 per gallon. WHO WOULD THINK?  And we are still dependent on foreign oil sources. Lets switch to domestic gas and regain our independence.

New York City

Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond counties
Monthly Average Home Heating Oil Prices (in cents per gallon)

Sept.Oct.Nov.Dec.Jan.Feb.Mar.Apr.MayJuneJulyAug.
2011-12403.3402.1414.0408.1413.2
2010-11313.9323.8336.5346.4365.3384.7409.8427.7419.0410.9409.1402.1
2009-10281.3289.6298.4300.0315.2308.8314.6323.2316.7313.4312.9311.0
2008-09417.3355.3317.0278.6269.7262.7258.1257.4260.3277.7275.0281.4
2007-08292.6307.8340.3350.7357.6359.3394.9418.0445.4481.8481.5439.9
2006-07275.0264.1261.7265.7256.6265.6268.5275.4277.1282.1290.4284.6
2005-06281.3280.8267.3263.4265.3264.7265.3278.8286.0280.5285.2285.2
2004-05192.4218.0222.1215.2216.4220.4233.7240.7
2003-04159.5161.0162.0169.4181.5183.9181.8180.0
2002-03146.4149.0149.8155.8166.9192.4198.2172.5
2001-02152.1144.2138.6134.2135.5135.5137.8141.2
2000-01161.8165.2169.3173.3169.3161.2157.6153.4
1999-00116.9119.9124.4128.7156.6182.3155.0147.1
1998-99109.4108.9109.1107.4107.6106.9108.0108.7
1997-98119.2120.9121.7121.7120.3119.5116.5114.2

Friday, February 10, 2012

Another hall of shame candidate

Recently I received a call, and a person on another end of the line asked me if I want to take over the job from another company. He fired heating contractor and wants someone to finish the job. Iin those cases I always have to evaluate the previous installation, because if I take over the job, whole job becomes my responsibility. So I drive to upper Manhattan and see this beautiful brownstone under construction. What I saw inside left me speechless. Boiler installed not approved for NYC, radiant system which is not really radiant, except that contractor used PEX instead of pipe, illegality and bad trade practices in each aspect of installation, And a owner, asking me to make it work.  After I said that everything must be scrapped, and proper system must be installed, I never heard from him again. I wish him good luck with his project, and posting video of mechanical room.


Thursday, February 9, 2012

A University Heated By Country’s Largest Geothermal System | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation

A University Heated By Country’s Largest Geothermal System | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation:


How do you heat and cool 47 buildings and 25,000 people without using any fuel, and only minimal electricity?

By digging. Or more specifically: by installing an elaborate underground geothermal energy system that can both heat water during the winter, and cool it in the summer.

Geothermal electricity production may still be in its infancy in the U.S. But Ball State University, in Muncie, Indiana, is showing how geothermal technology can provide at large scale, and deliver big financial and carbon savings. Although the project, which spreads across 731 acres, will initially cost $70 to 75 million, it will cut the college’s bills by $2 million a year, and halve its CO2 output. The project is already 50 percent finished, with full completion expected in 2013. Assuming the cost of electricity remains the same, it will be paid off around 2050.

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